Monday Lecture Series 2017-18

The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House proudly presents the 15th season of its popular Monday Lecture Series. This season’s innovative line-up features six guest speakers covering a range of topics inspired by the life, work, and legacy of Susan B. Anthony.

September 18, 2017    A Monument to Woman—The Woman Suffrage Statue. Sandra Weber, author and historian

November 13, 2017   Unknown Frederick Douglass: The Life & Times of New Washington City.  John H. Muller, DC Public Library, author, historian

December 4, 2017   Woman Suffrage & the New York Constitutional Conventions of 1846 & 1867-68. ​ Dr. Jenny Lloyd, History Professor Emerita, The College at Brockport

Women’s History Month special Tea – March 5, 2018   Margaret Fuller, the “Marriage Question,” & the Culture of Reform.  T. Gregory Garvey, Professor of English, College at Brockport

May 7, 2018  Funding Feminism: Following the Money in the Woman Suffrage Movement.   Dr. Joan Marie Johnson, historian

June 18, 2018   Spiritualists, Suffragists, & Other Nasty Women of the Mid-19th Century.  Dr. Amy Lehman, Associate Professor, Theater and Dance, University of South Carolina

Each presentation is offered in our Carriage House as a noon luncheon ($30 individual reservation) or 2 pm informal tea ($15 individual reservation), except for our Women’s History Month presentation on March 5, 2018, which will only be offered as a lecture and tea ($25). A Season Pass to five luncheons plus the Women’s History Month special Tea is  $175 for non-members, or $150 for members, for a limited time only.

Reservations opened for members on August 24 (Members, check your email for the link!).

Reservations for the general public are available here.

Historic Speeches

Behind every stride towards Civil Rights, throughout  was an individual who swayed opinions, demanded equality, and inspired. Most often, they did this through a series of speeches. The National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House has collected several historical speeches from suffragists and abolitionists for performance at VoteTilla, now available to read in full.

 

Susan B. Anthony’s Return to the “Old Union” speech; 1863

Susan B. Anthony’s “Is it a Crime to Vote?”; 1872-1873

Susan B. Anthony’s “Woman Wants Bread, Not the Ballot”; 1880-1890

Susan B. Anthony’s “Social Purity”; 1895

Clara Barton from The Life of Clara Barton, by Percy Harold; 1898

Antoinette Brown Blackwell’s speech at the Tenth National Women’s Rights Convention at Cooper Institute; 1860

Excerpts from Amelia Bloomer’s “Most Terribly Bereft”; 1855 (given in Council Bluffs, Iowa)

Amelia Bloomer’s “Woman’s Right to the Ballot”; 1895

Carrie Chapman Catt’s “The Crisis”; 1916 (Atlantic City, New Jersey)

Carrie Chapman Catt’s Address to the United States Congress; November, 1917 (given in Washington, D.C.)

Frederick Douglass’ “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”; July 5, 1852 (given in Rochester, New York)

Frederick Douglass’ “Woman Suffrage Movement,” printed in New National Era; 1870

Frederick Douglass’ Emancipation of Women speech at the 20th annual meeting of the New England Woman Suffrage Association; 1888 (given in Boston, Massachusetts)

Matilda Joslyn Gage’s “The Dangers of the Hour” at the Woman’s National Liberal Convention; February 24, 1890

Matilda Joslyn Gage’s speech at the National Women’s Rights Convention; 1852 (given in Syracuse, New York)

Jean Brooks Greenleaf’s address to the House Judiciary Committee; 1892

Sarah Grimké’s Letters to Mary Parker; 1837

Hester Jeffrey’s Eulogy of Susan B. Anthony

Rev. Jermain Wesley Loguen’s “I Won’t Obey the Fugitive Slave Law”; October 4, 1850 (given in Syracuse, New York)

Samuel May’s “The Rights and Condition of Women,”; 1846

Lucretia Mott’s “Discourse on Woman”; December 17, 1849

Anna Howard Shaw’s “The Fundamental Principle of a Republic”; June 21, 1915 (given at the City Opera House in Ogdenburg, New York)

Gerrit Smith’s speech at the Syracuse National Convention; 1852

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s Seneca Falls Keynote Address; July 19, 1848

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s address on Woman’s Rights; September 1848

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s speech to the Reunion of the Pioneers and Friends of Woman’s Progress; November 12,1895

Lucy Stone’s speech to the Women’s Rights Convention; 1848 (given in Seneca Falls, New York)

Mary Church Terrell’s “The Progress of Colored Women”; 1904

Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I A Woman?” at the National Women’s Rights Convention; 1851

Sojourner Truth’s “Mob Convention” speech; 1853 (given in NYC, New York)

Sojourner Truth’s speech at the American Equal Rights Association meeting; 1867

Harriet Tubman’s words, through an excerpt from Harriet, The Moses of Her People, by Sarah H. Bradford

Angelina Grimké Weld’s speech at Pennsylvania Hall; 1838

Ida B. Wells’ Class Legislation; 1893

Ida B. Wells’ “How Enfranchisement Stops Lynchings” in Original Rights Magazine; June 1910

Fannie Barrier Williams’ “The Colored Girl”; 1905

 

 

 

Remember Susan B. Anthony on March 13

sba_fullOn March 13, 1906, at forty minutes past midnight, Susan B. Anthony died at the age of 86 in her own bed on the second floor of the house on Madison Street, her home of 40 years.

At her request, much of the ceremonial mourning of the day was not observed: no shades were drawn, no black crepe hung. Only a simple wreath of violets was placed on the front door. For two days, close friends and family came to call. Then on March 15, the world said good-bye at an immense funeral held in Central Presbyterian Church (now the Hochstein School of Music). Amid a raging blizzard, thousands of mourners filled the church and over ten thousand more passed by her flag-draped coffin that was flanked by an honor guard of women students from the University of Rochester—the school she’d finally opened up to them in 1901. Next to the coffin was a silk suffrage flag with four gold stars, representing the only states where women then could vote; pinned on her breast was a jeweled flag pin with four diamond stars, a gift from women of Wyoming, the first in our nation to win the vote, thanks to all of her efforts on their behalf.IMG_3042

The Rochester newspaper of the day reported: “Rochester made no secret of its personal grief. There must have been people of every creed, political party, nationality, and plane of life in those long lines that kept filing through the aisles of Central Church. The young and the aged of the land were represented. Every type was there to bow in reverence, respect and grief. Professional men, working men, financiers came to offer homage. Women brought little children to see the face of her who had aimed at being the emancipator of her sex, but whose work had ended just as victory seemed within reach. Priests, ministers…, rabbis …, came to look upon her who had more than once given them inspiration in dark moments.”

The service in the church lasted an hour and a half. It took another 2 or more hours for the thousands of mourners to file past the coffin. Finally, in late afternoon, with the snowstorm still raging, Susan B’s most intimate friends and relatives accompanied her to her final resting place in Mt. Hope Cemetery. There, beneath a simple white stone engraved only with her name and dates, she was laid to rest. The final words were spoken by her dear friend, the Rev. Anna Howard Shaw, who in tender and reverent voice, pronounced these solemn words: “Dear friend, thou hast tarried with us long; thou has now gone to thy well-earned rest. We beseech the Infinite Spirit who has upheld thee to make us worthy to follow in thy steps and carry on the work. Hail and farewell.”

Some years earlier, during a family reunion at her birthplace in Adams, Massachusetts, Susan B. Anthony had written her own epitaph. As the family gathered out in the yard on a glorious summer day, amid the horse-drawn carriages of all those who had come to call, someone remarked that the scene looked like a funeral. Anthony immediately replied:

“When it is a funeral, remember that I want there should be no tears.
Pass on, and go on with the work.”

Please join us for a memorial wreath ceremony on Monday, March 13, at 11:45 am. The short ceremony will be followed by a Lunch and Lecture in our Carriage House (that event is sold out). The wreath hanging is free and open to the public. Dress for the weather.

Women Making History from 1917-2017 Presentation

Join the Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library

March 7, 2017

12:12 – 12:52 pm

Presenter:

Deborah L. Hughes, President and CEO,

National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House

Kate Gleason Auditorium

Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County

115 South Avenue, Rochester, NY

This year marks the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote in New York State, and women now hold unprecedented levels of leadership in government. Hear about events planned for upstate New York within the historical context of women’s longstanding struggle for political, social and economic equality.

Cocktail Reception to Celebrate 100 Years of New York Women¹s Right to Vote

Join the University of Rochester’s Susan B. Anthony Center, the Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, and the American Association of University Women (AAUW) as we celebrate, 2017: 100 Years of New York Women’s Right to Vote

 

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

5:30-7:30 PM

*Program begins promptly at 6:15 PM

Memorial Art Gallery, Bausch and Lomb Parlor Room

 

Join us for a cocktail reception and a short program. We will unveil our 2017 calendar of events to commemorate this historic anniversary throughout the year. We will also unveil a self-guided art tour at the Memorial Art Gallery that has been specifically created to honor the centennial to showcase
women artists to celebrate their contributions to the field of art.

RSVP to Susan B. Anthony Center at sbac@ur.rochester.edu by
Monday, January 16

Free and convenient parking will be available

Ann Dexter Gordon, Ph.D. to Speak at 2017 Susan B. Anthony Birthday Luncheon

The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House is proud to announce the keynote speaker for the 2017 Susan B. Anthony Birthday Luncheon is Ann Dexter Gordon, Ph.D., the leading authority on Susan B. Anthony and editor of the Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony.   Her body of work not only protects the legacy of Anthony and Stanton, but will inform feminist scholarship for generations. The annual luncheon will be held Wednesday, February 15, 2017, at the Joseph A. Floreano Rochester Riverside Convention Center.  The date corresponds with Susan B. Anthony’s 197th Birthday.

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“In 2017, we will launch New York’s suffrage centennial and our theme is Susan B. Inspires Me,” says Deborah L. Hughes, President & CEO of the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House.  “There is no better time to bring this leading scholar who is also an engaging speaker  to our Rochester audience.”

Gordon served as program consultant and gave an onscreen interview for the 1999 Ken Burns documentary series Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony.  Her essay “Taking Possession of the Country” appears in the companion volume to the documentary.

She is a graduate of Smith College and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in American history. Gordon is Research Professor Emerita in the Department of History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.    She has written numerous articles in women’s history and biography, and edited a collection of essays by scholars of African-American history, African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965 (1997).

The Susan B. Anthony Birthday Luncheon is held each year in mid-February to celebrate Susan B. Anthony’s February 15th birthday, to honor contemporary women who continue her legacy, and to raise awareness of the educational and inspirational programs offered by the Museum. Individual seats and group tables may be purchased online at www.susanbanthonyhouse.org or by calling 585/279-7490 x 10.  Corporate sponsorships are still available. Contact Lesia Telega at 585/279-7490 x 12 for more information.

Questions related to this event may be directed to luncheon@susanbanthonyhouse.org.

Election Coverage November 2016 Media Round Up

For over a week, there were fifteen media outlets including all of the Rochester network affiliates – 8, 10, and 13, Time Warner Cable News, the Democrat & Chronicle as well as national and international media including the New York Times, CNN, and the BBC came or called to the home where Susan B. Anthony lived and worked for over 40 years.

Before the election, CNN Digital sent reporter Tiara Chiaromonte to interview Deborah Hughes the weekend before the election. The CNN digital interview went “viral” with more than 60,000 viewers seeing it on our Facebook page and over SIX MILLION viewers at CNN: http://ow.ly/WkqQ306y0HZ

Also during the week leading up to the election, Susan B. Anthony Museum & House President & CEO Deborah Hughes was interviewed by nyupstate.com from Syracuse and Channel 4 from Buffalo: http://ow.ly/KDa5306y0Op

 

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One of the more poignant interviews during the week leading up to the election was conducted by Berkely Brean of Channel 10.  Brean interviewed Dr. Ruth Scott, Lois Geiss, and Deborah Hughes in the Attic of 17 Madison Street, the home of Susan B. Anthony. Dr. Scott served on the Rochester City Council from 1977-89. In 1986, Dr. Scott was elected as the Council’s first President. Scott’s leadership was instrumental as the City moved from a City Manager form of government to a directly elected mayor.  Lois Geiss also served as Rochester City Council President. Anthony Museum & House President & CEO Deborah Hughes pointed out that the third floor of the house, known as the garret or attic, the location of the interview was dedicated to the woman’s suffrage movement.

On Election Day there was a flurry of activity at the Museum! From New York City, came a reporter and photographer from the New York Times.   The journalists were part of a news team of female journalists who were sent to various locations around the country to report the events of the day. http://ow.ly/nwsx306y1dU

At the end of a very busy day, reporter Solina Lewis from Channel 8 interviewed Deborah Hughes and also did a live report from our parking lot for the 6:00 p.m. News.

View all media coverage

Democrat & Chronicle http://ow.ly/bPN8306y2zC

WROC-TV 8 http://ow.ly/Nwkc306y284  and http://ow.ly/m7mB306y2e9

Live Coverage of gravesite http://ow.ly/8rnZ306y2Uq

WHAM-TV 13 http://ow.ly/mH5y306y2K4

WXXI-TV http://ow.ly/ZfNa306y3je

BBC http://ow.ly/HpsC306y3yw

Talk of the Town http://ow.ly/lvSy306y3IG

Time Warner Cable News http://ow.ly/OpUI306y4az and http://ow.ly/eBAr306y4bu

Huffington Post  http://ow.ly/zFtj306y4BX

 

 

Anthony Museum Raises Concern over Continued Misuse of Anthony’s Name and Legacy

Rochester, NY – In light of recent events in the world of American politics, the National Susan B Anthony Museum & House today reiterated its nonpartisan educational mission to inspire and challenge individuals, through Susan B Anthony’s life and work, to make a positive difference in their lives and communities.

 

Today, presidential candidate, Donald Trump, announced his intention to create a “pro-life coalition” headed by Marjorie Dannenfelser of the Susan B. Anthony List. This coalition would work to support Mr. Trump’s previously declared commitments to the anti-abortion movement and to encourage voter turnout in key battleground states. The Susan B. Anthony List is a 501(c)(4) organization. Along with its affiliated political action committee, the SBA List Candidate Fund, this organization has long raised concerns for the Anthony Museum and those dedicated to protecting the legacy of the great reformer. Neither organization is in any way affiliated or in partnership with the National Susan B Anthony Museum & House.

 

“Not only does the Museum maintain a nonpartisan perspective,” said president and CEO, Deborah L. Hughes, “but it would not be in keeping with Susan B. Anthony’s legacy to endorse a political candidate. We are pleased that this once-reviled woman has earned such a high place of honor and authority that individuals and organizations seek her as their champion, but the National Susan B Anthony Museum & House is here to tell the authentic story of her life and work, rather than to use her name for a political agenda.”

 

The National Susan B Anthony Museum & House, a 501(c)(3) educational entity, is dedicated to preserving and interpreting Anthony’s life and work in a historically accurate and responsible manner. It is not affiliated with any other organization bearing the name of Susan B Anthony.

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Please send any inquiries re: this statement to president & CEO, Deborah L. Hughes.