June 2018 Monday Lecture Series

Spiritualists, Suffragists, & Other Nasty Women of the Mid-19th Century, a lecture by Dr. Amy Lehman, Associate Professor, Theatre and Dance, University of South Carolina

When a woman spoke out or performed on a public stage or reform platform in mid-19th c. America, she was likely to be labelled a “nasty woman” – or worse. Whether as a suffragist, spiritualist, abolitionist or actress, if she were seen to abandon her sacred domestic role as the “Angel in the House” a woman might expect fierce public scrutiny and often scathing criticism. This talk will discuss the struggles and strategies of celebrated women activists and reformers like Susan B. Anthony, who despite relentless opposition, nonetheless persisted in making their voices heard.

The noon Lecture & Luncheon is SOLD OUT.
The 2pm Lecture & Tea is SOLD OUT.

VoteTilla To Be Presented with Award

VoteTilla, a July 2017 project of the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House,  will be awarded  the Engaging Communities Award as part of the Museum Association of New York’s 2018 conference “Visioning Change.” The Award Ceremony will take place at 8:00 AM on Monday, April 9, 2018 at the Hyatt Regency Rochester. Photo opportunities available. For further information please contact info@nysmuseums.org or 518-273-3400.

UPDATE: Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul presenting the MANY Engaging Communities Award for July 2017’s VoteTilla to the Anthony Museum. Accepting the award are Deborah L. Hughes and Sharon Salluzzo (Chair, Board of Trustees). We share this award with all the volunteers and partners who made VoteTilla a success!

Deborah L. Hughes to Speak at Arizona State University

On Thursday, March 29, Deborah L. Hughes will present Interpreting a 19th Century Icon for the 21st Century: The National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House at Arizona State University, Institute for Humanities Research, Tempe, Arizona.  That afternoon she will talk about the challenges involved in running a museum dedicated to the women’s rights icon and that is itself an historical landmark. She will also discuss the museum’s efforts to make its collections more accessible to 21st century audiences.

Hughes is president, CEO, and executive director of the Susan B. Anthony Museum and House in Rochester, New York, a position she’s held since 2007. Hughes has a degree in religious studies from University of Oregon and a graduate degree from Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School.


The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House interprets the legacy of the great reformer to inspire and challenge individuals to make a positive difference in their lives and communities. We preserve and share the National Historic Landmark that was her home and headquarters, collect and exhibit artifacts related to her life and work, and offer tours and interpretive programs to share her story with the world.

Greater New York City Chamber of Commerce Honors Deborah L. Hughes and the Anthony Museum

Each year, the Greater New York City Chamber of Commerce celebrates Women’s History Month with an awards reception recognizing influential women—including past honorees NYS Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul. With this year’s theme “Celebrating Equality, Fairness, Respect & 100 Years of Voting Rights!,” we are pleased to announce that Deborah Hughes, president and CEO of the National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House, will be honored at the Chamber’s  reception on March 22nd, along with honorees Jennifer Gold of the The Carlyle Group NY Center for Cybersecurity & Resilience;  Sandra Wilkin of the Bradford Construction & Women’s Builders Council; and Dina Bakst & Sherry Leiwant, co-founders of A Better Balance.

The Women’s History Awards Reception will take place Thursday, March 22,  2018, from 6:00pm – 8:00 pm, at the General Society Library, 20 W. 44th Street, New York City.

Here is a link to the  Greater New York City Chamber of Commerce event.

Women Voted in New York Before Columbus

League of Women Voters Rochester Metropolitan Area Presents

Women Voted in New York Before Columbus

 Monday, March 19, 2018, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Nazareth College, 4245 East Avenue, Linehan Chapel, Golisano Academic Center

A talk by Dr. Sally RoeschWagner, Professor, Syracuse University; Director of Matilda Joslyn Gage Center for Social Justice Dialogue

When women in New York State began to organize for their rights in 1848, they took their cue from the nearby Haudenosaunee communities, where women lived in the world that non-native women dreamed.

The program will be followed by a book signing and a reception with light refreshments provided by our host, Nazareth College.

Hosted by Nazareth College in recognition of the Helen Guthrie Memorial Lecture

This event, which is free and open to the public, is made possible through the support of the New York Council for the Humanities’ Public Scholars program.

Cosponsored by:

The American Association of University Women

The Friends of Ganondagan

The National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Rochester Section

National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House

The Susan B. Anthony Center at the University of Rochester

Advance registration is required.

For more information and registration visit https://tinyurl.com/women-voted or call 585.262.3730.

Wreath Ceremony Commemorates Susan B. Anthony’s Death and Legacy

National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House Commemorates  Susan B. Anthony’s Death and Legacy

 

Rochester, NY – The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House will host a ceremonial wreath hanging on the front steps of 17 Madison Street, the National Historic Landmark that was Susan B. Anthony’s home and headquarters, on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

The brief ceremony commemorates the 112th anniversary of Susan B. Anthony’s death and will include remarks by Anthony Museum President & CEO, Deborah L. Hughes.

This event is free and open to the public.

Rennes France to Honor Susan B. Anthony

Rennes, France to Honor Susan B. Anthony

Delegation to represent Rochester and the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House

 

On International Women’s Day, March 8, 2018, Rochester, NY’s sister city, Rennes, France will dedicate a square to honor Susan B. Anthony. Susan B. Anthony was one of the founders of the International Council of Women, and was most interested in ensuring rights for women around the world.

On Saturday March 3, a delegation of 30 participants associated with the National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House and the International Sister Cities of Rochester  will gather at 17 Madison Street, the site of the Anthony Museum in Rochester, NY, to board a bus for Toronto. From there the group will fly to France to participate in the Rennes dedication.

In addition, on March 7, the Anthony Museum executive director & CEO Deborah L. Hughes will give  a presentation on Susan B. Anthony and her quest for justice. You can read more about her presentation here.

The Anthony Museum will be sharing posts on Facebook & Twitter throughout the trip using the hashtag #SusanB-Rennes.

2018 also marks the 60th anniversary of the Rennes-Rochester Sister Cities program.

Monday Lecture Series 2017-18

2017-2018

The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House proudly presents the 15th season of its popular Monday Lecture Series. This season’s innovative line-up features six guest speakers covering a range of topics inspired by the life, work, and legacy of Susan B. Anthony.

September 18, 2017    A Monument to Woman—The Woman Suffrage Statue. Sandra Weber, author and historian

November 13, 2017   Unknown Frederick Douglass: The Life & Times of New Washington City.  John H. Muller, DC Public Library, author, historian

December 4, 2017   Woman Suffrage & the New York Constitutional Conventions of 1846 & 1867-68. ​ Dr. Jenny Lloyd, History Professor Emerita, The College at Brockport

Women’s History Month special Tea – March 5, 2018   Margaret Fuller, the “Marriage Question,” & the Culture of Reform.  T. Gregory Garvey, Professor of English, College at Brockport.  This presentation is SOLD OUT.

May 7, 2018  Funding Feminism: Following the Money in the Woman Suffrage Movement.   Dr. Joan Marie Johnson, historian

June 18, 2018   Spiritualists, Suffragists, & Other Nasty Women of the Mid-19th Century.  Dr. Amy Lehman, Associate Professor, Theater and Dance, University of South Carolina This presentation is SOLD OUT.

Each presentation is offered in our Carriage House as a noon luncheon ($30 individual reservation) or 2 pm informal tea ($15 individual reservation), except for our Women’s History Month presentation on March 5, 2018, which will only be offered as a lecture and tea ($25).

Remember Susan B. Anthony on March 13

sba_fullOn March 13, 1906, at forty minutes past midnight, Susan B. Anthony died at the age of 86 in her own bed on the second floor of the house on Madison Street, her home of 40 years.

At her request, much of the ceremonial mourning of the day was not observed: no shades were drawn, no black crepe hung. Only a simple wreath of violets was placed on the front door. For two days, close friends and family came to call. Then on March 15, the world said good-bye at an immense funeral held in Central Presbyterian Church (now the Hochstein School of Music). Amid a raging blizzard, thousands of mourners filled the church and over ten thousand more passed by her flag-draped coffin that was flanked by an honor guard of women students from the University of Rochester—the school she’d finally opened up to them in 1901. Next to the coffin was a silk suffrage flag with four gold stars, representing the only states where women then could vote; pinned on her breast was a jeweled flag pin with four diamond stars, a gift from women of Wyoming, the first in our nation to win the vote, thanks to all of her efforts on their behalf.IMG_3042

The Rochester newspaper of the day reported: “Rochester made no secret of its personal grief. There must have been people of every creed, political party, nationality, and plane of life in those long lines that kept filing through the aisles of Central Church. The young and the aged of the land were represented. Every type was there to bow in reverence, respect and grief. Professional men, working men, financiers came to offer homage. Women brought little children to see the face of her who had aimed at being the emancipator of her sex, but whose work had ended just as victory seemed within reach. Priests, ministers…, rabbis …, came to look upon her who had more than once given them inspiration in dark moments.”

The service in the church lasted an hour and a half. It took another 2 or more hours for the thousands of mourners to file past the coffin. Finally, in late afternoon, with the snowstorm still raging, Susan B’s most intimate friends and relatives accompanied her to her final resting place in Mt. Hope Cemetery. There, beneath a simple white stone engraved only with her name and dates, she was laid to rest. The final words were spoken by her dear friend, the Rev. Anna Howard Shaw, who in tender and reverent voice, pronounced these solemn words: “Dear friend, thou hast tarried with us long; thou has now gone to thy well-earned rest. We beseech the Infinite Spirit who has upheld thee to make us worthy to follow in thy steps and carry on the work. Hail and farewell.”

Some years earlier, during a family reunion at her birthplace in Adams, Massachusetts, Susan B. Anthony had written her own epitaph. As the family gathered out in the yard on a glorious summer day, amid the horse-drawn carriages of all those who had come to call, someone remarked that the scene looked like a funeral. Anthony immediately replied:

“When it is a funeral, remember that I want there should be no tears.
Pass on, and go on with the work.”

Please join us for a memorial wreath ceremony on Monday, March 13, at 11:45 am. The short ceremony will be followed by a Lunch and Lecture in our Carriage House (that event is sold out). The wreath hanging is free and open to the public. Dress for the weather.